The CA Directory solution provides a mechanism to automate daily on-line backups, via one simple parameter:

dump dxgrid-db period 0 86400;

Where the first number is the offset from GMT/UTC (in seconds) and the second number is how often to run the backup (in seconds), e.g. Once a day = 86400 sec = 24 hr x 60 min/hr x 60 sec/min

Two Gaps/Challenge(s):

History: The automated backup process will overwrite the existing offline file(s) (*.zdb) for the Data DSA. Any requirement or need to perform a RCA is lost due to this fact. What was the data like 10 days ago? With the current state process, only the CA Directory or IM logs would be of assistance.

Size: The automated backup will create an offline file (*.zdb) footprint of the same size as the data (*.db) file. If your Data DSA (*.db) is 10 GB, then your offline (*.zdb) will be 10 GB. The Identity Provisioning User store has four (4) Data DSAs, that would multiple this number , e.g. four (4) db files + four (4) offline zdb files at 10 GB each, will require minimal of 80 GB disk space free. If we attempt to retain a history of these files for fourteen (14) days, this would be four (4) db + fourteen (14) zdb = eighteen (18) x 10 GB = 180 GB disk space required.

Resolutions:

Leverage the CA Directory tool (dxdumpdb) to convert from the binary data (*.db/*.zdb) to LDIF and the OS crontab for the ‘dsa’ account to automate a post ‘online backup’ export and conversion process.

Step 1: Validate the ‘dsa’ user ID has access to crontab (to avoid using root for this effort). cat /etc/cron.allow

If access is missing, append the ‘dsa’ user ID to this file.

Step 2: Validate that online backup process have been scheduled for your Data DSA. Use a find command to identify the offline files (*.zdb ). Note the size of the offline Data DSA files (*.zdb).

Step 3: Identify the online backup process start time, as defined in the Data DSA settings DXC file or perhaps DXI file. Convert this GMT offset time to the local time on the CA Directory server. (See references to assist)

Step 4: Use crontab -e as ‘dsa’ user ID, to create a new entry: (may use crontab -l to view any entries). Use the dxdumpdb -z switch with the DSA_NAME to create the exported LDIF file. Redirect this output to gzip to automatically bypass any need for temporary files. Note: Crontab has limited variable expansion, and any % characters must be escaped.

Example of the crontab for ‘dsa’ to run 30 minutes after (at 2 am CST) the online backup process is scheduled (at 1:30 am CST).

# Goal:  Export and compress the daily DSA offline backup to ldif.gz at 2 AM every day
# - Ensure this crontab runs AFTER the daily automated backup (zdb) of the CA Directory Data DSAs
# - Review these two (2) tokens for DATA DSAs:  ($DXHOME/config/settings/impd.dxc  or ./impd_backup.dxc)
#   a)   Location:  set dxgrid-backup-location = "/opt/CA/Directory/dxserver/backup/";
#   b)   Online Backup Period:   dump dxgrid-db period 0 86400;
#
# Note1: The 'N' start time of the 'dump dxgrid-db period N M' is the offset in seconds from midnight of UTC
#   For 24 hr clock, 0130 (AM) CST calculate the following in UTC/GMT =>  0130 CST + 6 hours = 0730 UTC
#   Due to the six (6) hour difference between CST and UTC TZ:  7.5 * 3600 = 27000 seconds
# Example(s):
#   dump dxgrid-db period 19800 86400;   [Once a day at 2330 CST]
#   dump dxgrid-db period 27000 86400;   [Once a day at 0130 CST]
#
# Note2:  Alternatively, may force an online backup using this line:
#               dump dxgrid-db;
#        & issuing this command:  dxserver init all
#
#####################################################################
#        1      2         3       4       5        6
#       min     hr      d-o-m   month   d-o-w   command(s)
#####################################################################
#####
#####  Testing Backup Every Five (5) Minutes ####
#*/5 * * * *  . $HOME/.profile && dxdumpdb -z `dxserver status | grep "impd-main" | awk "{print $1}"` | gzip -9 > /tmp/`hostname`_`dxserver status | grep "impd-main" | awk '{print $1}'`_`/bin/date --utc +\%Y\%m\%d\%H\%M\%S.0Z`.ldif.gz
#####
#####  Backup daily at 2 AM CST  -  30 minutes after the online backup at 1:30 AM CST #####
#####
0 2 * * *    . $HOME/.profile &&  dxdumpdb -z `dxserver status | grep "impd-main"   | awk "{print $1}"` | gzip -9 > /tmp/`hostname`_`dxserver status | grep "impd-main"   | awk '{print $1}'`_`/bin/date --utc +\%Y\%m\%d\%H\%M\%S.0Z`.ldif.gz
0 2 * * *    . $HOME/.profile &&  dxdumpdb -z `dxserver status | grep "impd-co"     | awk "{print $1}"` | gzip -9 > /tmp/`hostname`_`dxserver status | grep "impd-co"     | awk '{print $1}'`_`/bin/date --utc +\%Y\%m\%d\%H\%M\%S.0Z`.ldif.gz
0 2 * * *    . $HOME/.profile &&  dxdumpdb -z `dxserver status | grep "impd-inc"    | awk "{print $1}"` | gzip -9 > /tmp/`hostname`_`dxserver status | grep "impd-inc"    | awk '{print $1}'`_`/bin/date --utc +\%Y\%m\%d\%H\%M\%S.0Z`.ldif.gz
0 2 * * *    . $HOME/.profile &&  dxdumpdb -z `dxserver status | grep "impd-notify" | awk "{print $1}"` | gzip -9 > /tmp/`hostname`_`dxserver status | grep "impd-notify" | awk '{print $1}'`_`/bin/date --utc +\%Y\%m\%d\%H\%M\%S.0Z`.ldif.gz

Example of the above lines that can be placed in a bash shell, instead of called directly via crontab. Note: Able to use variables and no need to escape the `date % characters `

# set DSA=main &&   dxdumpdb -z `dxserver status | grep "impd-$DSA" | awk '{print $1}'` | gzip -9 > /tmp/`hostname`_`dxserver status | grep "impd-$DSA" | awk '{print $1}'`_`/bin/date --utc +%Y%m%d%H%M%S.0Z`.ldif.gz
# set DSA=co &&     dxdumpdb -z `dxserver status | grep "impd-$DSA" | awk '{print $1}'` | gzip -9 > /tmp/`hostname`_`dxserver status | grep "impd-$DSA" | awk '{print $1}'`_`/bin/date --utc +%Y%m%d%H%M%S.0Z`.ldif.gz
# set DSA=inc &&    dxdumpdb -z `dxserver status | grep "impd-$DSA" | awk '{print $1}'` | gzip -9 > /tmp/`hostname`_`dxserver status | grep "impd-$DSA" | awk '{print $1}'`_`/bin/date --utc +%Y%m%d%H%M%S.0Z`.ldif.gz
# set DSA=notify && dxdumpdb -z `dxserver status | grep "impd-$DSA" | awk '{print $1}'` | gzip -9 > /tmp/`hostname`_`dxserver status | grep "impd-$DSA" | awk '{print $1}'`_`/bin/date --utc +%Y%m%d%H%M%S.0Z`.ldif.gz
#

Example of the output:

Monitor with tail -f /var/log/cron (or syslog depending on your OS version), when the crontab is executed for your ‘dsa’ account

View the output folder for the newly created gzip LDIF files. The files may be extracted back to LDIF format, via gzip -d file.ldif.gz. Compare these file sizes with the original (*.zdb) files of 2GB.

Recommendation(s):

Implement a similar process and retain this data for fourteen (14) days, to assist with any RCA or similar analysis that may be needed for historical data. Avoid copied the (*.db or *.zdb) files for backup, unless using this process to force a clean sync between peer MW Data DSAs.

The Data DSAs may be reloaded (dxloadb) from these LDIF snapshots; the LDIF files do not have the same file size impact as the binary db files; and as LDIF files, they may be quickly search for prior data using standard tools such as grep “text string” filename.ldif.

This process will assist in site preparation for a DAR (disaster and recovery) scenario. Protect your data.

References:

dxdumpdb

https://techdocs.broadcom.com/content/broadcom/techdocs/us/en/ca-enterprise-software/layer7-identity-and-access-management/directory/14-1/administrating/tools-to-manage-ca-directory/dxtools/dxdumpdb-tool-export-data-from-a-datastore-to-an-ldif-file.html

dump dxgrid-db

https://techdocs.broadcom.com/content/broadcom/techdocs/us/en/ca-enterprise-software/layer7-identity-and-access-management/directory/14-1/reference/commands-reference/dump-dxgrid-db-command-take-a-consistent-snapshot-copy-of-a-datastore.html

If you wish to learn more or need assistance, contact us.

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