Authenticate to vApp ‘dsa’ user ID via ssh private key

The Symantec (CA) Identity Suite includes the Symantec (CA) Directory. This component is installed under the ‘dsa’ service ID. On the virtual appliance, this ‘dsa’ service ID does not have a password defined, and therefore no login is allowed.

As an enhancement, we would like to add in a SSH private key to allow authentication to the ‘dsa’ service ID from other virtual appliances and desktop usage with various tools, e.g. Putty, MobaXterm, WinSCP, etc. This enhancement will allow for a streamlined process to address out-of-sync Directory DATA DSAs with scp/Rsync copies without intermediate file shares or use of other service IDs.

Challenge:

The virtual appliance of Symantec (CA) Identity Suite r14.3 is built on CentOS 6.4. The OpenSSH services on this OS apparently do not use a private key format that can be used by desktop tools or the PuttyGen (keygen conversion tool). However, the private key may be used between vApp servers if using the FQDN (full qualified domain name). We noted that during testing, that localhost is not allowed due to localhost not defined in the SSHD “AllowedUsers” property file.

On newer virtual appliances vApp r14.4 with CentOS 8 Stream, this challenge does not exist, and we can use the OpenSSH private key, id_rsa, with the desktop tools as-is.

To assist with challenge and streamlining this process we have the following three (2) options:

Option 1: On newer OS, use OpenSSH process

After creating the private key, ./ssh/id_rsa, cat this file out to notepad, and save for use with the desktop tools

Generate this OpenSSH private/public key. The final command will help to validate this private key may be used for server to server communication.

echo y | ssh-keygen -t rsa -b 4096 -N Password02 -C "$USER@$HOSTNAME" -f .ssh/id_rsa ; ls -lart .ssh ; cat .ssh/id_rsa ; cat .ssh/id_rsa.pub >> .ssh/authorized_keys ; chmod 600 .ssh/authorized_keys ; ssh -v -i .ssh/id_rsa $USER@`hostname`

Option 2: Skip the OpenSSH process, use PuttyGen

On any OS (new/old) just use Putty-Gen tool to generate the private key. Update key comment/passphrase. After the private key is created, copy the TEXT “Public Key for pasting into OpenSSH authorized_keys file”. Just like it says, and then you may use the associated private key, id_rsa.ppk, with the desktop tools for the ‘dsa’ service ID.

Option 3: Combination of processes/tools

Important: .ssh/authorized_keys is updated and not overwritten.

Be kind to your auditors – Streamline Adhoc Reports

One of the challenges that IAM/IAG teams may have every few months is delivery or access for internal/external auditors to validate access within the IAM/IAG system and their managed endpoints.

Usually, auditors may directly access the 100’s system/endpoints/applications and randomly select a few or export the entire directory structure to review access. This effort takes time and possible 100’s of entitlements to grant temporary/expiry access to view. Auditors also prefer Excel or CSV files to review rather than fixed documents (PDF) to allow them to filter and isolate what interests them.

One process that may have value for your team is various tools with export functionality to CSV/XLS and the ability to query the 100’s-1000’s of systems from a single entry point.

A tool that we have found valuable over the years is SoftTerra LDAP Browser.

https://www.ldapadministrator.com/softerra-ldap-browser.htm

The multiple benefits from this tool for IAM/IAG are:

  1. It is a read-only tool, so no mistakes can be made by granting too much access.
  2. It has the ability to save queries that are popular and can be copied from other tools.
  3. It has the ability to export the queries to CSV/XLS formats (plus others)
  4. It can be used to pull reports from an IAM/IAG solution via their directory ports.
  5. It can be used to pull reports from the managed applications (on-prem or SaaS) via the IAM provisioning directory ports.
  6. The tool is free from SoftTerra, it is a limited version of their Administration tool
Example of the SoftTerra LDAP Browser tool used to query Active Directory, LDAP user stores, and Provisioning User Store & managed endpoints/applications.

A view to export Service Now (SNOW) accounts via the CA/Symantec Identity Manager Provisioning Server/Service (TCP 20390) via the LDAP/S protocol.

Why? The provisioning server may be viewed as a virtual directory/pass-through directory to the managed endpoints via its connector tier.

The below image shows SoftTerra LDAPBrowser used to connect to the Provisioning Server (TCP 20390). Then navigate to a Service Now (SNOW) managed endpoint, to query on all accounts and their respective profiles & entitlements. This same report/extract process may be done for mainframe/AS400 and client-server applications, e.g Active Directory, Unix, Databases, etc.

Enhance this process with defense-in-depth

We will not use the primary default administration account of the provisioning tier, “etaadmin”. Since this account has full access to change data.

Within the IAM/IAG solution, create an auditor account.

In the example below we create a new Global User, with the name “auditor”, a description, password, and a local “read-only admin profile” with an expiration date. This will allow the auditors to use the account as they wish (or you may grant this “read-only admin profile directly to their existing Global User ID). The account may still follow the same password reset expiration processes. If the account is marked as “restricted” in the CA/Symantec IM solution, then this account is limited how it may be changed to avoid any unexpected sync challenges to managed endpoints (if it was correlated to other accounts).

After the new Global User is created (or existing ID is added to the Admin Profile “ReadAdministrator”), update SoftTerra Credentials for the Provisioning Service. Below the new DN with “auditor” is shown in the credentials for login ID, e.g. “eTGlobalUserName=auditor,eTGlobalUserContainerName=Global Users,eTNamespaceName=CommonObjects,dc=im,dc=eta”

Now, the auditors may run as many reports as they would like, and export to spreadsheets or PDF files using a read-only account with a read-only tool.

Honorable mentions for other query tools.

Jxplorer is a useful & free java-based tool for reports, but this is a full edit tool & only exports out to LDIF format. http://jxplorer.org/

Apache Directory Studio is another very useful & free java-based tool for reports. This is a full edit tool. It does have the ability to export to many different formats. Since this tool does NOT need an MS Windows installer, and if the Desktop prevent installation, this is typically our 2nd choice to use. Extract and use the current java on the MS Windows OS or download AdoptOpenJDK and extract it to use with Apache Directory Studio. https://directory.apache.org/studio/ & https://adoptopenjdk.net/

SoftTerra LDAP Administrator is a paid and full edit tool. It has the same look-n-feel of the SoftTerra LDAP Browser tool. It is typically used by administrators of various LDAP solutions. We recommend this tool for your larger sites or if you would like a fast responsive tool on MS Windows OS. https://www.ldapadministrator.com/

If you have other recommendations, please leave a response.

Bonus Feature – SoftTerra AD Authentication

Both the SoftTerra tools allow binding using your existing authentication (on your desktop/laptop) into Active Directory. No need to create additional user ID for the auditors or yourself.

Perhaps the O365 or Outlook contacts process is not robust or too slow or perhaps you wish you had a more detail view of your internal active directory to view a manager’s direct reports. You can use this feature to view the the non-privacy attributes of your domain of all accounts with a read-only tool.

Step 01: Open a command-line prompt on your desktop/workstation after you have authenticated to your Active Directory domain & type set | findstr LOGONSERVER

Step 02: Install SoftTerra LDAP Browser Tool & Create a new profile

Step 03: Type the name of the Active Directory LOGONSERVER (aka Domain Controller) into the following fields & ensure “Use Secure Connection (SSL)” is selected (to avoid query issues).

Step 04: Click Next until you see “User Authentication Information” then select the radio button for “Currently logged on user (Active Directory)”, then click Finish button.

Step 05: After the profile is built, now click on the profile and watch it expand into a tree display of Active Directory. Select the branch that you believe has the list of users you would like to view, then select an individual user account, to see the values populated.

Step 06: If you wish to export this data to a spreadsheet (CSV/XLS), right click on the left object and select export option.

Step 07: You will have a series of options to export to & the file name it will write to.

Step 08: Advance search and export process. Select the branch that holds all the users you wish to view and export. Note: If the branch has 10,000 objects, this process may take minutes to complete depending on the query.

Step 09: The follow search windows will appear to help you create, save, and export your queries. Note that if you start to type in the field name, the list of the fields will start to appear.

Step 10: Ensure the FILTER is properly formed (use google to assist), and which attribute you wish to view or export is defined, then click search. If you are satisfied with your search, use the “Save Results” to export to a spreadsheet (CSV/XLS) or other format.

Disaster Recovery Scenarios for Directories

Restore processes may be done with snapshots-in-time for both databases and directories. We wished to provide clarity of the restoration steps after a snapshot-in-time is utilized for a directory. The methodology outlined below has the following goals: a) allow sites to prepare before they need the restoration steps, b) provide a training module to exercise samples included in a vendor solution.

In this scenario, we focused on the CA/Broadcom/Symantec Directory solution. The CA Directory provides several tools to automate online backup snapshots, but these processes stop at copies of the binary data files.

Additionally, we desired to walk-through the provided DAR (Disaster and Recovery) scenarios and determine what needed to be updated to reflect newer features; and how we may validate that we did accomplish a full restoration.

Finally, to assist with the decision tree model, where we need to triage and determine if a full restore is required, or may we select partial restoration via extracts and imports of selected data.

Cluster Out-of-Sync Scenario

Awareness

The first indicator that a userstore (CA Directory DATA DSA) is out-of-sync will be the CA Directory logs themselves, e.g. alarm or trace logs.

Another indication will be inconsistent query results for a user object that returns different results when using a front-end router to the DATA DSAs.

After awareness of the issue, the team will exercise a triage process to determine the extent of the out-of-sync data. For a quick check, one may execute LDAP queries direct to the TCP port of each DATA DSA on each host, and examine the results directory or even the total number of entries, e.g. dxTotalEntryCount.

The returned count value will help determine if the number of entries for each DATA DSA on the peer MW hosts are out-of-sync for ADD or DEL operations. The challenge/GAP with this method is it will not show any delta due to modify operations on the user objects themselves, e.g. address field changed.

Example of LDAP queries (dxsearch/ldapsearch) to CA Directory DATA DSA for the CA Identity Management solution (4 DATA DSA and 1 ROUTER DSA)

su - dsa    OR [ sudo -iu dsa ]
echo -n Password01 > .impd.pwd ; chmod 600 .impd.pwd

# NOTIFY BRANCH (TCP 20404) 
LDAPTLS_REQCERT=never  dxsearch -LLL -H ldaps://`hostname`:20404 -D 'eTDSAContainerName=DSAs,eTNamespaceName=CommonObjects,dc=etadb' -y .impd.pwd -s sub -b 'dc=notify,dc=etadb' '(objectClass=*)' dxTotalEntryCount
dn: dc=notify,dc=etadb

# INC BRANCH (TCP 20398)
LDAPTLS_REQCERT=never  dxsearch -LLL -H ldaps://`hostname`:20398 -D 'eTDSAContainerName=DSAs,eTNamespaceName=CommonObjects,dc=etadb' -y .impd.pwd -s sub -b 'eTInclusionContainerName=Inclusions,eTNamespaceName=CommonObjects,dc=im,dc=etadb' '(objectClass=*)' dxTotalEntryCount

# CO BRANCH (TCP 20396)
LDAPTLS_REQCERT=never  dxsearch -LLL -H ldaps://`hostname`:20396 -D 'eTDSAContainerName=DSAs,eTNamespaceName=CommonObjects,dc=etadb' -y .impd.pwd -s sub -b 'eTNamespaceName=CommonObjects,dc=im,dc=etadb' '(objectClass=*)' dxTotalEntryCount

# MAIN BRANCH (TCP 20394)
LDAPTLS_REQCERT=never  dxsearch -LLL -H ldaps://`hostname`:20394 -D 'eTDSAContainerName=DSAs,eTNamespaceName=CommonObjects,dc=etadb' -y .impd.pwd -s sub -b 'dc=im,dc=etadb' '(objectClass=*)' dxTotalEntryCount

# ALL BRANCHES - Router Port (TCP 20391)
LDAPTLS_REQCERT=never  dxsearch -LLL -H ldaps://`hostname`:20391 -D 'eTDSAContainerName=DSAs,eTNamespaceName=CommonObjects,dc=etadb' -y .impd.pwd -s sub -b 'dc=etadb' '(objectClass=*)' dxTotalEntryCount

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A better process to identify the delta(s) will be automating the daily backup process, to build out LDIF files for each peer MW DATA DSA and then performing a delta process between the LDIF files. We will walk through this more involve step later in this blog entry.

Recovery Processes

The below link has examples from CA/Broadcom/Symantec with recovery notes of CA Directory DATA DSA that are out-of-sync due to extended downtime or outage window.

The below image pulled from the document (page 9.) shows CA Directory r12.x using the latest recovery processes of “multiwrite-DISP” (MW-DISP) mode.

This recovery process of MW-DISP is default for the CA Identity Management DATA DSAs via the install wizard tools, when they create the IMPD DATA DSAs.

https://knowledge.broadcom.com/external/article?articleId=54088

The above document is dated, and still mentions additional file structures that have been retired, e.g. oc/zoc, at,zat.

An enhancement request has been submitted for both of these requests:

https://community.broadcom.com/participate/ideation-home/viewidea?IdeationKey=c71a304b-a689-4894-ac1c-786c9a2b2d0d

The modified version we have started for CA Directory r14.x adds some clarity to the <dsaname>.dx files; and which steps may be adjusted to support the split data structure for the four (4) IMPD DATA DSAs.

The same time flow diagram was used. Extra notes were added for clarity, and if possible, examples of commands that will be used to assist with direct automation of each step (or maybe pasted in an SSH session window, as the dsa service ID).

Step 1, implicit in the identification/triage process, is to determine what userstore data is out-of-sync and how large a delta do we have. If the DSA service has been shut down (either deliberately or via a startup issue), if the shutdown delay is more than a few days, then the CA Directory process will check the date stamp in the <dsaname>.dp file and the transaction in the <dsaname>.tx file; if the dates are too large CA Directory will refuse to start the DATA DSA and issue a warning message.

Step 2, we will leverage the dxdisp <dsaname> command to generate a new time-stamp file <dsaname>.dx, that will be used to prevent unnecessary sync operations with any data older than the date stamp in this file. 

This command should be issued for every DATA DSA on the same host—Especially true for split DATA DSAs, e.g. IMPD (CA Identity Manager’s Provisioning Directories). In our example below, to assist with this step, we use a combination of commands with a while-loop to issue the dxdisp command.

This command can be executed regardless if the DSA is running or shutdown. If an existing <dsaname>.dx file exists, any additional execution of dxdisp will add updated time-stamps to this file.  

Note: The <dsaname>.dx file will be removed upon restart of the DATA DSA.

STEP 2: ISSUE DXDISP COMMAND [ Create time-stamp file for re-sync use ] ON ALL IMPD SERVERS.

su - dsa OR [ sudo -iu dsa ]
bash
dxserver status | grep -v router | awk '{print $1}' | while IFS='' read -r LINE || [ -n "$LINE" ] ; do dxdisp "$LINE" ;done ; echo ; find $DXHOME -name "*.dx" -exec ls -larth {} \;

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Step 3 will then ask for an updated online backup to be executed. 

In earlier release of CA Directory, this required a telnet/ssh connection to the dxconsole of each DATA DSA. Or using the DSA configuration files to contain a dump dxgrid-db; command that would be executed with dxserver init all command. 

In newer releases of CA Directory, we can leverage the dxserver onlinebackup <dsaname> process. 

This step can be a challenge to dump all DATA DSAs at the same time, using manual procedures. 

Fortunately, we can automate this with a single bash shell process; and as an enhancement, we can also generate the LDIF extracts of each DATA DSA for later delta compare operations.

Note: The DATA DSA must be running (started) for the onlinebackup process to function correctly. If unsure, issue a dxserver status or dxserver start all prior. 

Retain the LDIF files from the “BAD” DATA DSA Servers for analysis.

STEP 3a-3c: ON ALL IMPD DATA DSA SERVERS - ISSUE ONLINE BACKUP PROCESS
su - dsa OR [ sudo -iu dsa ]
bash

dxserver status | grep started | grep -v router | awk '{print $1}' | while IFS='' read -r LINE || [ -n "$LINE" ] ; do dxserver onlinebackup "$LINE" ; sleep 10; dxdumpdb -w -z -f /tmp/`date '+%Y%m%d_%H%M%S_%s'`_$LINE.ldif $LINE ;done ; echo ; find $DXHOME -name "*.zdb" -exec ls -larth {} \; ; echo ; ls -larth --time-style=full-iso /tmp/*.ldif | grep  `date '+%Y-%m-%d'`

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Step 4a Walks through the possible copy operations from “GOOD” to the “BAD” DATA DSA host, for the <dsaname>.zdb files. The IMPD DATA DSA will require that three (3) of four (4) zdb files are copied, to ensure no impact to referential integrity between the DATA DSA.

The preferred model to copy data from one remote host to another is via the compressed rsync process over SSH, as this is a rapid process for the CA Directory db / zdb files.

https://anapartner.com/2020/05/03/wan-latency-rsync-versus-scp/

Below are the code blocks that demonstrate examples how to copy data from one DSA server to another DSA server.

# RSYNC METHOD
sudo -iu dsa

time rsync --progress -e 'ssh -ax' -avz --exclude "User*" --exclude "*.dp" --exclude "*.tx" dsa@192.168.242.135:./data/ $DXHOME/data

# Scroll to see entire line 
# SCP METHOD   
sudo -iu dsa

scp   REMOTE_ID@$HOST:./data/<folder_impd_data_dsa_name>/*.zdb   /tmp/dsa_data
/usr/bin/mv  /tmp/dsa_data/<incorrect_dsaname>.zdb   $DXHOME/data/<folder_impd_data_dsa_name>/<correct_dsaname>.db

# Scroll to see entire line 

Step 4b Walk through the final steps before restarting the “BAD” DATA DSA.

The ONLY files that should be in the data folders are <dsaname>.db (binary data file) and <dsaname>.dx (ASCII time-stamp file). Ensure that the copied <prior-hostname-dsaname>.zdb file has been renamed to the correct hostname & extension for <dsaname>.db

Remove the prior <dsaname>.dp (ASCII time-stamp file) { the DATA DSA will auto replace this file with the *.dx file contents } and the <dsaname>.tx (binary data transaction file).

Step 5a Startup the DATA DSA with the command

dxserver start all

If there is any issue with a DATA or ROUTER DSA not starting, then issue the same command with the debug switch (-d)

dxserver -d start <dsaname>

Use the output from the above debug process to address any a) syntax challenges, or b) older PID/LCK files ($DXHOME/pid)

Step 5b Finally, use dxsearch/ldapsearch to query a unit-test of authentication with the primary service ID. Use other unit/use-case tests as needed to confirm data is now synced.

bash
echo -n Password01 > .impd.pwd ; chmod 600 .impd.pwd

LDAPTLS_REQCERT=never dxsearch -LLL -H ldaps://`hostname`:20394 -D 'eTDSAContainerName=DSAs,eTNamespaceName=CommonObjects,dc=etadb' -y .impd.pwd -s base -b 'eTDSAContainerName=DSAs,eTNamespaceName=CommonObjects,dc=etadb' '(objectClass=*)' | perl -p00e 's/\r?\n //g'

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LDIF Recovery Processes

The steps above are for recovery via a 100% replacement method, where the assumption is that the “bad” DSA server does NOT have any data worth keeping or wish to be reviewed.

We wish to clarify a process/methodology, where the “peer” Multi-write DSA may be out-of-sync. Still, we are not sure “which” is truly the “good DSA” to select, or perhaps we wished to merge data from multiple DSA before we declare one to be the “good DSA” (with regards to the completeness of data).

Using CA Directory commands, we can join them together to automate snapshots and exports to LDIF files. These LDIF files can then be compared against their peers MW DATA DSA exports or even to themselves at different snapshot export times. As long as we have the LDIF exports, we can recover from any DAR scenario.

Example of using CA Directory dxserver and dxdumpdb commands (STEP 3) with the ldifdelta and dxmodify commands.

The output from ldifdelta may be imported to any remote peer MW DATA DSA server to sync via dxmodify to that hostname, to force a sync for the few objects that may be out-of-sync, e.g. Password Hashes or other.

dxserver status | grep started | grep -v router | awk '{print $1}' | while IFS='' read -r LINE || [ -n "$LINE" ] ; do dxserver onlinebackup "$LINE" ; sleep 10; dxdumpdb -z -f /tmp/`date '+%Y%m%d_%H%M%S_%s'`_$LINE.ldif $LINE ;done ; echo ; find $DXHOME -name "*.zdb" -exec ls -larth {} \; ; echo ; ls -larth --time-style=full-iso /tmp/*.ldif | grep  `date '+%Y-%m-%d'`

ldifdelta -x -S ca-prov-srv-01-impd-co  /tmp/20200819_122820_1597858100_ca-prov-srv-01-impd-co.ldif   /tmp/20200819_123108_1597858268_ca-prov-srv-01-impd-co.ldif  |  perl -p00e 's/\r?\n //g'  >   /tmp/delta_file_ca-prov-srv-01-impd-co.ldif   ; cat /tmp/delta_file_ca-prov-srv-01-impd-co.ldif

echo -n Password01 > .impd.pwd ; chmod 600 .impd.pwd
dxmodify -v -c -h`hostname` -p 20391  -D 'eTDSAContainerName=DSAs,eTNamespaceName=CommonObjects,dc=etadb' -y .impd.pwd -f /tmp/delta_file_ca-prov-srv-01-impd-co.ldif

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The below images demonstrate a delta that exists between two (2) time snapshots. The CA Directory tool, ldifdelta, can identify and extract the modified entry to the user object.

The following examples will show how to re-import this delta using dxmodify command to the DATA DSA with no other modifications required to the input LDIF file.

In the testing example below, before any update to an object, let’s capture a snapshot-in-time and the LDIF files for each DATA DSA.

Lets make an update to a user object using any tool we wish, or command line process like ldapmodify.

Next, lets capture a new snapshot-in-time after the update, so we will be able to utilize the ldifdelta tool.

We can use the ldifdelta tool to create the delta LDIF input file. After we review this file, and accept the changes, we can then submit this LDIF file to the remote peer MW DATA DSA that are out-of-sync.

Hope this has value to you and any challenges you may have with your environment.

WAN Latency: Rsync versus SCP

We were curious about what methods we can use to manage large files that must be copied between sites with WAN-type latency and also restrict ourselves to processes available on the CA Identity Suite virtual appliance / Symantec IGA solution.

Leveraging VMware Workstation’s ability to introduce network latency between images, allows for a validation of a global password reset solution.

If we experience deployment challenges with native copy operations, we need to ensure we have alternatives to address any out-of-sync data.

The embedded CA Directory maintains the data tier in separate binary files, using a software router to join the data tier into a virtual directory. This allows for scalability and growth to accommodate the largest of sites.

We focused on the provisioning directory (IMPD) as our likely candidate for re-syncing.

Test Conditions:

  1. To ensure the data was being securely copied, we kept the requirement for SSH sessions between two (2) different nodes of a cluster.
  2. We introduce latency with VMware Workstation NIC for one of the nodes.

3. The four (4) IMPD Data DSAs were resized to 2500 MB each (a similar size we have seen in production at many sites).

4. We removed data and the folder structure from the receiving node to avoid any checksum restart processes from gaining an unfair advantage.

5. If the process allowed for exclusions, we did take advantage of this feature.

6. The feature/process/commands must be available on the vApp to the ‘config’ or ‘dsa’ userIDs.

7. The reference host/node that is being pulled, has the CA Directory Data DSAs offline (dxserver stop all) to prevent ongoing changes to the files during the copy operation.

Observations:

SCP without Compression: Unable to exclude other files (*.tx,*.dp, UserStore) – This process took over 12 minutes to copy 10,250 MB of data

SCP with Compression: Unable to exclude other files (*.tx,*.dp, UserStore) – This process still took over 12 minutes to copy 10,250 MB of data

Rsync without compression: This process can exclude files/folders and has built-in checksum features (to allow a restart of a file if the connection is broken) and works over SSH as well. If the folder was not deleted prior, then this process would give artificial high-speed results. This process was able to exclude the UserStore DSA files and the transaction files (*.dp & *.tx) that are not required to be copied for use on a remote server. Only 10,000 MB (4 x 2500 MB) was copied instead of an extra 250 MB.

Rsync with compression: This process can exclude files/folders and has built-in checksum features (to allow a restart of a file if the connection is broken) and works over SSH as well. This process was the winner, and; extremely amazing performance over the other processes.

Total Time: 1 min 10 seconds for 10,000 MB of data over a WAN latency of 70 ms (140 ms R/T)

Now that we have found our winner, we need to do a few post steps to use the copied files. CA Directory, to maintain uniqueness between peer members of the multi-write (MW) group, have a unique name for the data folder and the data file. On the CA Identity Suite / Symantec IGA Virtual Appliance, pseudo nomenclature is used with two (2) digits.

The next step is to rename the folder and the files. Since the vApp is locked down for installing other tools that may be available for rename operations, we utilized the find and mv command with a regular xpression process to assist with these two (2) steps.

Complete Process Summarized with Validation

The below process was written within the default shell of ‘dsa’ userID ‘csh’. If the shell is changed to ‘bash’; update accordingly.

The below process also utilized a SSH RSA private/public key process that was previously generated for the ‘dsa’ user ID. If you are using the vApp, change the userID to config; and su – dsa to complete the necessary steps. You may need to add a copy operation between dsa & config userIDs.

Summary of using rsync with find/mv to rename copied IMPD *.db files/folders
[dsa@pwdha03 ~/data]$ dxserver status
ca-prov-srv-03-impd-main started
ca-prov-srv-03-impd-notify started
ca-prov-srv-03-impd-co started
ca-prov-srv-03-impd-inc started
ca-prov-srv-03-imps-router started
[dsa@pwdha03 ~/data]$ dxserver stop all > & /dev/null
[dsa@pwdha03 ~/data]$ du -hs
9.4G    .
[dsa@pwdha03 ~/data]$ eval `ssh-agent` && ssh-add
Agent pid 5395
Enter passphrase for /opt/CA/Directory/dxserver/.ssh/id_rsa:
Identity added: /opt/CA/Directory/dxserver/.ssh/id_rsa (/opt/CA/Directory/dxserver/.ssh/id_rsa)
[dsa@pwdha03 ~/data]$ rm -rf *
[dsa@pwdha03 ~/data]$ du -hs
4.0K    .
[dsa@pwdha03 ~/data]$ time rsync --progress -e 'ssh -ax' -avz --exclude "User*" --exclude "*.dp" --exclude "*.tx" dsa@192.168.242.135:./data/ $DXHOME/data
FIPS mode initialized
receiving incremental file list
./
ca-prov-srv-01-impd-co/
ca-prov-srv-01-impd-co/ca-prov-srv-01-impd-co.db
  2500000000 100%  143.33MB/s    0:00:16 (xfer#1, to-check=3/9)
ca-prov-srv-01-impd-inc/
ca-prov-srv-01-impd-inc/ca-prov-srv-01-impd-inc.db
  2500000000 100%  153.50MB/s    0:00:15 (xfer#2, to-check=2/9)
ca-prov-srv-01-impd-main/
ca-prov-srv-01-impd-main/ca-prov-srv-01-impd-main.db
  2500000000 100%  132.17MB/s    0:00:18 (xfer#3, to-check=1/9)
ca-prov-srv-01-impd-notify/
ca-prov-srv-01-impd-notify/ca-prov-srv-01-impd-notify.db
  2500000000 100%  130.91MB/s    0:00:18 (xfer#4, to-check=0/9)

sent 137 bytes  received 9810722 bytes  139161.12 bytes/sec
total size is 10000000000  speedup is 1019.28
27.237u 5.696s 1:09.43 47.4%    0+0k 128+19531264io 2pf+0w
[dsa@pwdha03 ~/data]$ ls
ca-prov-srv-01-impd-co  ca-prov-srv-01-impd-inc  ca-prov-srv-01-impd-main  ca-prov-srv-01-impd-notify
[dsa@pwdha03 ~/data]$ find $DXHOME/data/ -mindepth 1 -type d -exec bash -c 'mv  $0 ${0/01/03}' {} \; > & /dev/null
[dsa@pwdha03 ~/data]$ ls
ca-prov-srv-03-impd-co  ca-prov-srv-03-impd-inc  ca-prov-srv-03-impd-main  ca-prov-srv-03-impd-notify
[dsa@pwdha03 ~/data]$ find $DXHOME/data -depth -name '*.db' -exec bash -c 'mv  $0 ${0/01/03}' {} \; > & /dev/null
[dsa@pwdha03 ~/data]$ dxserver start all
Starting all dxservers
ca-prov-srv-03-impd-main starting
..
ca-prov-srv-03-impd-main started
ca-prov-srv-03-impd-notify starting
..
ca-prov-srv-03-impd-notify started
ca-prov-srv-03-impd-co starting
..
ca-prov-srv-03-impd-co started
ca-prov-srv-03-impd-inc starting
..
ca-prov-srv-03-impd-inc started
ca-prov-srv-03-imps-router starting
..
ca-prov-srv-03-imps-router started
[dsa@pwdha03 ~/data]$ du -hs
9.4G    .
[dsa@pwdha03 ~/data]$


Note: An enhancement has been open to request that the ‘dsa’ userID is able to use remote SSH processes to address any challenges if the Data IMPD DSAs need to be copied or retained for backup processes.

https://community.broadcom.com/participate/ideation-home/viewidea?IdeationKey=7c795c51-d028-4db8-adb1-c9df2dc48bff

Example for vApp Patches:

Note: There is no major different in speed if the files being copied are already compressed. The below image shows that initial copy is at the rate of the network w/ latency. The value gain from using rsync is still the checksum feature that allow auto-restart where it left off.

vApp Patch process refined to a few lines (to three nodes of a cluster deployment)

# PATCHES
# On Local vApp [as config userID]
mkdir -p patches  && cd patches
curl -L -O ftp://ftp.ca.com/pub/CAIdentitySuiteVA/cumulative-patches/14.3.0/CP-VA-140300-0002.tar.gpg
curl -L -O ftp://ftp.ca.com/pub/CAIdentitySuiteVA/cumulative-patches/14.3.0/CP-IMV-140300-0001.tgz.gpg
screen    [will open a new bash shell ]
patch_vapp CP-VA-140300-0002.tar.gpg           [Patch VA prior to any solution patch]
patch_vapp CP-IMV-140300-0001.tgz.gpg
exit          [exit screen]
cd ..
# Push from one host to another via scp
IP=192.168.242.136;scp -r patches  config@$IP:
IP=192.168.242.137;scp -r patches  config@$IP:
# Push from one host to another via rsync over ssh          [Minor gain for compressed files]
IP=192.168.242.136;rsync --progress -e 'ssh -ax' -avz $HOME/patches config@$IP:
IP=192.168.242.137;rsync --progress -e 'ssh -ax' -avz $HOME/patches config@$IP:
# Pull from one host to another via rsync over ssh          [Minor gain for compressed files]
IP=192.168.242.135;rsync --progress -e 'ssh -ax' -avz config@$IP:./patches $HOME

# View the files were patched
IP=192.168.242.136;ssh -tt config@$IP "ls -lart patches"
IP=192.168.242.137;ssh -tt config@$IP "ls -lart patches"

# On Remote vApp Node #2
IP=192.168.242.136;ssh $IP
cd patches
screen    [will open a new bash shell ]
patch_vapp CP-VA-140300-0002.tar.gpg
patch_vapp CP-IMV-140300-0001.tgz.gpg
exit          [exit screen]
exit          [exit to original host]

# On Remote vApp Node #3
IP=192.168.242.137;ssh $IP
cd patches
screen    [will open a new bash shell ]
patch_vapp CP-VA-140300-0002.tar.gpg
patch_vapp CP-IMV-140300-0001.tgz.gpg
exit          [exit screen]
exit          [exit to original host]

View of rotating the SSH RSA key for CONFIG User ID

# CONFIG - On local vApp host
ls -lart .ssh     [view any prior files]
echo y | ssh-keygen -b 4096 -N Password01 -C $USER -f $HOME/.ssh/id_rsa
IP=192.168.242.135;ssh-keyscan -p 22 $IP >> .ssh/known_hosts
IP=192.168.242.136;ssh-keyscan -p 22 $IP >> .ssh/known_hosts
IP=192.168.242.137;ssh-keyscan -p 22 $IP >> .ssh/known_hosts
cp -r -p .ssh/id_rsa.pub .ssh/authorized_keys
rm -rf /tmp/*.$USER.ssh-keys.tar
tar -cvf /tmp/`/bin/date -u +%s`.$USER.ssh-keys.tar .ssh
ls -lart /tmp/*.$USER.ssh-keys.tar
eval `ssh-agent` && ssh-add           [Enter Password for SSH RSA Private Key]
IP=192.168.242.136;scp `ls /tmp/*.$USER.ssh-keys.tar`  config@$IP:
IP=192.168.242.137;scp `ls /tmp/*.$USER.ssh-keys.tar`  config@$IP:
USER=config;ssh -tt $USER@192.168.242.136 "tar -xvf *.$USER.ssh-keys.tar"
USER=config;ssh -tt $USER@192.168.242.137 "tar -xvf *.$USER.ssh-keys.tar"
IP=192.168.242.136;ssh $IP `/bin/date -u +%s`
IP=192.168.242.137;ssh $IP `/bin/date -u +%s`
IP=192.168.242.136;ssh -vv $IP              [Use -vv to troubleshoot ssh process]
IP=192.168.242.137;ssh -vv $IP 				[Use -vv to troubleshoot ssh process]